Common Council Charade: “Running Things Like a Business” (Part 3)

You must read the full article , Maintenance, fees, and debt debated at golf course budget meeting, in the Mohawk Valley Compass to see how the interests of select golfers supersede the interests of the public. Here is salient exchange:

“You can argue until you’re blue with me, I’m telling you what I’m going to put in there,” said Barone.

“It doesn’t operate that way in any golf course in the United States,” said Ritter.

“That’s fine, but it’s going to do it here,” said Barone.

Barone said he intends to introduce a resolution at an upcoming council meeting which would remove the fee for guests.

I’d not particularly care all that much if we were extending a perk to golfers. But, when you harp on about how you “protect seniors” and the city “cannot afford” anything and our city is literally “bankrupt” or the myriad of other laments anytime money is spent to lurch the city forward, then you cannot reconcile the above with the following statements:

Toward the end of the meeting, Hatzenbuher asked Ritter, “What do you think needs to be done to make the course solvent?”

[snip]

“Let us raise the rates, let us get revenue in the door. We have to have revenue,” said Ritter. “We need you to work with us and not fight with us,” she said and then mentioned the earlier debate over cart fees. “Those things have got to end. We are trying to run this as a business.”

It’s beyond dispute that the golf course is a public golf course and that it’s operations and finances rely upon the public, you know,  taxpayers. And I daresay , seniors. Every dollar in bonding by the city for the golf course is a dollar not bonded for alternate projects in the city. Furthermore, we learn that the course itself faces financial risks with its eroding revenues and as a result, places its liabilities directly on the backs of taqxpayers if they cannot sustain operations but incur liabilities through bonding and notes.

Finally, I have to believe that Christmas comes early for me this year given that the article ends with a very earnest call to “run this as a business.” when that is anything but what is actually is happening at the golf course.

I grow tired of this charade.

Common Council Charade: “Running Things Like a Business” (Part 3)

You must read the full article , Maintenance, fees, and debt debated at golf course budget meeting, in the Mohawk Valley Compass to see how the interests of select golfers supersede the interests of the public. Here is salient exchange:

“You can argue until you’re blue with me, I’m telling you what I’m going to put in there,” said Barone.

“It doesn’t operate that way in any golf course in the United States,” said Ritter.

“That’s fine, but it’s going to do it here,” said Barone.

Barone said he intends to introduce a resolution at an upcoming council meeting which would remove the fee for guests.

I’d not particularly care all that much if we were extending a perk to golfers. But, when you harp on about how you “protect seniors” and the city “cannot afford” anything and our city is literally “bankrupt” or the myriad of other laments anytime money is spent to lurch the city forward, then you cannot reconcile the above with the following statements:

Toward the end of the meeting, Hatzenbuher asked Ritter, “What do you think needs to be done to make the course solvent?”

[snip]

“Let us raise the rates, let us get revenue in the door. We have to have revenue,” said Ritter. “We need you to work with us and not fight with us,” she said and then mentioned the earlier debate over cart fees. “Those things have got to end. We are trying to run this as a business.”

It’s beyond dispute that the golf course is a public golf course and that it’s operations and finances rely upon the public, you know,  taxpayers. And I daresay , seniors. Every dollar in bonding by the city for the golf course is a dollar not bonded for alternate projects in the city. Furthermore, we learn that the course itself faces financial risks with its eroding revenues and as a result, places its liabilities directly on the backs of taqxpayers if they cannot sustain operations but incur liabilities through bonding and notes.

Finally, I have to believe that Christmas comes early for me this year given that the article ends with a very earnest call to “run this as a business.” when that is anything but what is actually is happening at the golf course.

I grow tired of this charade.

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